Climbing Stairs with an Injured Leg

Simple Climbing Stairs Tips

As eager as we might be to sneak a little cardio into our daily routines, stairs can put a damper on any excursion, especially if you aren’t feeling completely steady on your feet due to an injury, surgery or general soreness.  Climbing Stairs With an Injured Leg

While there are a variety of assistive devices that can make stairs easier to climb, simply using good form and technique is oftentimes enough to get you where you are going.  The key to easier stair climbing lies in this simple phrase:

“Up with the good, down with the bad”

Not only does this pearl of wisdom sound like a discarded Tom Petty lyric, it also outlines how you should approach ascending and descending stairs.

Going “up with the good”

To climb up a flight of stairs, always lead with your stronger leg, as the first leg you move will need to support most of your body weight.

  1. Begin by standing at the landing of the steps with your feet side by side. If your right leg is stronger, try to hold the banister with your right hand and vice-versa.
  2. Get a good grip on the banister and raise your strong leg to the next step.
  3. With your strong leg planted on the step, shift your weight onto this leg and bring your weaker leg in line with your strong leg. Do not try to lift your weaker leg two steps at a time, as this will put lots of weight on your weaker leg on the following step.
  4. Repeat the process by raising your strong leg first, taking breaks when needed, until you reach the top of the stairs.

Going “down with the bad”

Your body mechanics are almost completely reversed when descending stairs, with your rear leg doing the majority of the work by lowering your body weight from step to step.

  1. Begin by standing at the landing of the steps with your feet side by side. If your right leg is weaker, try to hold the banister with your right hand and vice-versa.
  2. With a firm grip on the banister, bend your stronger leg slightly and bring your weaker foot down to the next lowest step.
  3. Try to spread your weight between the banister and your weaker leg and bring your stronger foot down in a small, fast step. Do not try to take two steps at a time, as this puts much more strain on your weaker leg.
  4. Repeat the process by lowering your weaker leg first, taking breaks when needed, until you reach the bottom of the stairs.

SelectCare Home Health Care Services of NY hopes you get some mileage out of this simple stair climbing trick.

Our team has more than 30 years of experience helping older New Yorkers live happier, healthier lives in the comfort of their long time homes despite challenges great and small.  To learn more about our services and how we can help your family, call SelectCare or request a free in-home health care guide today.

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